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Why is Judge Joe Brown silent as hell about justice for American Indians? Judge Joe THE LOCK JAW CHOCTAW!

Updated: Feb 2




The American Indian Community is asking why the silence about fighting for American Indian justice? Well now we know why!





Joseph Blakeney Brown Jr. (born July 5, 1947), known professionally as Judge Joe Brown, is an American former lawyer and television personality. He is a former Shelby County, Tennessee Criminal Court judge and a former arbiter of the arbitration-based reality court show Judge Joe Brown. This interview gives us great insight of the Elder American Indian 50BOLD: I understand that your family has a rich history and legacy. Can you share with our readers the history of your grandparents and great grandparents? What were some of the stories passed down? 

Brown: My maternal grandfather was born before the Civil War—1850. His father was a Nigerian, a Yoruba, who was kidnapped after the slave trade was officially over [in many northern and western states]. So, when they brought him over here in 1817, they had to set him free. He had to pay his owner, the person who brought him back, the purchase price. Be that as it may, my half-Nigerian grandfather was born in 1850. He became a physician but he wasn’t a nerd. 50BOLD: Why do you say he wasn’t a nerd?

Brown: One of my uncles got lynched, so my grandfather, and an uncle sought out and murdered, the two deputy sheriffs who they thought were responsible. Naturally, they then had to leave the state. They didn’t want to get lynched either, so they moved elsewhere. One of them ended up in Gary, Indiana and my grandfather went to Jackson, Tennessee. Interestingly enough, my grandfather and Alex Haley’s grandfather practiced medicine together as partners for years. 50BOLD: How old was your grandfather when he died? 

Brown: My grandfather made it to the age of 102.  I was the last person sitting on the side of his bed when he died. He had a journal that I received when I was in my 30s practicing law. The journal was passed on to me by my grandfather’s lawyer who was an old man at that point. Unfortunately, in an act of vindictiveness, my first wife destroyed it some 30 years ago. I had a Choctaw Native American grandmother on my mother’s side, and she had an interesting attitude toward life. She taught library science at Lane College up in Jackson, Tennessee. My grandfather was also a college physician up there. 50BOLD: And what about your paternal grandfather? 

Brown: My paternal grandfather was one of Bishop Charles Mason’s disciples (Editor’s note: Mason was the founder and first Senior Bishop of the Church of God in Christ, based in Memphis).

He took a coach to Kansas City in 1896 and received a doctoral degree in divinity. My grandmother, who was from New Orleans, was a school teacher. And her father was a very interesting Irishman who had other brothers. One went to Canada. Another went to New Orleans. The third one stayed in South Carolina and bought nearly four thousand slaves; he was a sea captain. But anyway, the one in New Orleans married my grandmother, so that’s how I got so high bright. And some of my attitude, I get from the Irishman side and also from the Native American side that are in me. It is what it is. We have this family tradition of service to the people. https://50bold.com/we-still-love-judge-joe-brown/


Urban Indian Heritage Society Senior Specialist Latasha Challenges Lock Jaw Joe about his claims of being Choctaw yet promoting everything else in open forums






When it's safe and convenient Judge Joe Brown claims his American Indian lineage however when legal assistance is needed dealing with Misclassification he is silent as an Indian Field Mice in the Cotton Fields




Judge Joe Bragging about how he uses his Mason secret words and grips for benefits in the KKK infested Mississippi areas. The perks of Secret Society Pays well right Judge Joe!




" I'm a Mason!" Nuff said



The Judge is one who endorses the use of DNA as valid proof of African lineage and identity however Lock Jaw ignores the fact that DNA has already been thrown out as invalid with the use of Company African Ancestry inclusion in the Reparations case YEARS AGO! African lineage DNA to America already tried for Reparations cases thrown out as not valid enough

When the topic of lineage is brought up the common tactic is brought up about African DNA. What's not mentioned at all is African DNA to the Americas has already been disregarded as insufficient . https://www.firsttribenation.com/post/african-lineage-dna-to-america-already-tried-for-reparations-cases-thrown-out-as-not-valid-enough


Judge Joe Brown the Secret Society Member






THE Honorable Judge Joe Brown On THE Truth About FREE Masonry & Goldman Sachs



Albert Pike: Confederate Commissioner, Masonic Demiurge, Apologist for Slavery, Apostate of the Union


  • Prosecuted land claims and reparations for the Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians before the U.S. Supreme Court; negotiated settlements with the federal government

  • Negotiated nine treaties with various Indian tribes as Commissioner to Indian Territory on behalf of the Confederate States of America Awarded thirty-third degree as a mason; appointed Sovereign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite for the Southern Jurisdiction

  • Single-handedly restructured the rituals of Scottish Rite Freemasonry, and published the definitive guide to masonic practice that is used to this day

But there was also his embrace of slavery, of White supremacy, of Southern secession despite his heritage as a Northerner. A statue of Pike, overthrown during Black Lives Matter protests in 2020, was placed near Judiciary Square in Washington, DC, in 1901. In 1871 he wrote an influential work, Morals and Dogma, for the Scottish Rite freemasons; the statue was but one token of their esteem for him. His own morals and dogmas sound harsh to modern ears, however. Albert Pike was a complicated person, both mighty and fallen. To paraphrase his fellow poet and journalist Walt Whitman, Albert Pike contained multitudes in his contradictions. 



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